Poll Suggests Vaccinated People Still Worry About Getting Sick from COVID-19

Headline Roundup January 25th, 2022

The most vaccinated people in the U.S. might still be more worried than unvaccinated people about getting sick from COVID-19. Why?

According to a poll from the Morning Consult and New York Times (Lean Left bias), 68% of people in the U.S. who have received a COVID-19 booster shot remain "very" or "somewhat" worried about getting sick from COVID-19 in the next year. That number is 61% for vaccinated, non-boosted people and just 39% for unvaccinated people. Twenty-seven percent of unvaccinated people say they're not worried at all about getting sick from COVID-19, compared to just 6% of boosted people who say the same. Reports across the spectrum say that vaccines offer good protection against severe illness, and evidence is growing that natural immunity has a similar effect; a recent U.S. study suggests that people who had previously been infected with COVID-19 were more protected against the Delta variant than those who were vaccinated but not previously infected. Roughly 63% of Americans are fully vaccinated, and roughly 40% of them have received a booster shot.

Some right-rated voices blamed pandemic policies for purportedly forcing vaccinated people to continue being anxious and concerned despite them being at low risk of severe illness. New York Times writer David Leonhardt called boosted people's concerns about getting sick from COVID-19 "a remarkable disconnect between perception and reality," while also framing unvaccinated peoples' lack of concern as irrational and describing how some conservatives and progressives have made vaccination status core to their identities.

From the Right
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ANALYSIS

Anxiety over COVID-19 might be an unhappy side effect of getting vaccinated against the disease.

I'm kidding, but you could be forgiven for drawing that tongue-in-cheek conclusion from a new Morning Consult/New York Times poll showing that vaccinated (and boosted) Americans are about twice as likely to say they are "very" or "somewhat" concerned about "getting sick from COVID-19 within the next year."

That is, of course, the exact opposite of what the actual science tells us. Even during the tremendous surge in COVID cases caused by the omicron variant, vaccinated individuals...

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From the Center
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The COVID-19 booster drive in the U.S. is losing steam, worrying health experts who have pleaded with Americans to get an extra shot to shore up their protection against the highly contagious Omicron variant.

Just 40% of fully vaccinated Americans have received a booster dose, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the average number of booster shots dispensed per day in the U.S. has plummeted from a peak of 1 million in early December to about 490,000 as of last week.

Also, a new poll from...

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From the Left
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ANALYSIS

Covid’s starkly different impact on the young and old has been one of the virus’s defining characteristics. It tends to be mild for children and younger adults but is often severe for the elderly. More than three-quarters of all U.S. Covid deaths have occurred among people 65 and older.

Given these patterns, it seems obvious that older Americans should be more fearful of Covid than younger Americans. Yet they’re not.

That’s one of the striking findings from a new poll that Morning Consult, a survey firm, has conducted for this...

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