December 2019 Jobs Report

Headline Roundup January 10th, 2020

According to the Labor Department's December jobs report, the unemployment rate remained at 3.5%, with an additional 145,000 jobs added. This fell just below expectations, with most Dow Jones experts who were surveyed predicting 160,000 additional jobs. After the report's release, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) crossed the 29,000-point threshold for the first time ever.

Many outlets, irrespective of leaning, focused on the connection between the labor report and the DJIA's record volume. Some reporting and analysis around the report focused on the decline in wages, steady government bond prices, and women overtaking men as the workforce's majority.

December 2019 Jobs Report

From the Right
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The Dow Jones Industrial Average on Friday crossed the 29,000 mark for the first time, as gains in technology and healthcare stocks offset concerns from a report showing slower-than-expected U.S. jobs growth in December.

U.S. stocks opened at record highs, brushing off government data that showed U.S. jobs increased by 145,000 last month, below the forecast for a 164,000 rise.

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From the Center
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WASHINGTON — The U.S. jobs market ended 2019 on a sour note, with December’s payroll and wage growth missing expectations, according to Labor Department figures released Friday.

Nonfarm payrolls increased by just 145,000 while the unemployment rate held steady at 3.5%. Economists surveyed by Dow Jones had been looking for job growth of 160,000. The jobless rate met expectations for staying at a 50-year low.

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From the Left
302

The latest jobs report included downward revisions to both October and November’s payroll gains. New jobs in October totaled 152,000, down 4,000 from the previous estimate. And payrolls in November were revised down by 10,000 to 256,000.

Ahead of the report, most economists expected that payrolls gains would decrease in December after surging in November, when General Motors (GM) employees striking between September and October returned to work and pushed up results. But the end of the strike only accounted for a net revised 39,300 of November’s payroll gains in...

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