Trump Administration To Revoke California's Power To Set Auto Emissions Standards

Headline Roundup September 18th, 2019

The Trump Administration plans to revoke California's power to set stricter air pollution standards for cars and trucks.

The Administration says that only the federal government can set fuel standards, according to the 1975 Energy Policy and Conservation Act. California has been relying on a special waiver to set its own emissions standards. This may lead to court battles over the next few years.

Trump Administration To Revoke California's Power To Set Auto Emissions Standards

From the Center
309
auto emissions, Trump Administration, California

The Trump administration is set to formally revoke California's tailpipe waiver under the Clean Air Act on Wednesday, according to a source with knowledge of the change.

The move is a major strike in the ongoing battle between the Trump administration and California over the state's right to enact more stringent air pollution standards due to its poor air quality.

It would come as Trump is fundraising in California, a state that has been a hotbed of resistance to his administration where Hillary Clinton won more than 4 million more...

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From the Right
309

The Trump administration will announce as early as Wednesday it is revoking California’s authority to set its own greenhouse gas and vehicle fuel efficiency standards and barring all states from setting such rules, two auto industry officials said on Tuesday.

The move is sure to spark legal challenges over issues including states' rights and climate change that administration officials say could ultimately be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Trump met with senior officials last Thursday and agreed to greenlight the plan to bar California from setting tailpipe emission standards...

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From the Left
309
auto emissions, Trump Administration, California

President Trump is expected Wednesday to revoke a decades-old rule that empowers California to set tougher car emissions standards than those required by the federal government — putting the state and the administration on a path to years of fighting in court.

The move, which has been in the works for much of the last three years, would overturn the foundation for California’s role as an environmental leader in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving air quality. By revoking a special waiver the state has relied on for years to...

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