Tom Steyer Drops Out of Democratic Primary

Headline Roundup March 1st, 2020

Tom Steyer, former hedge-fund manager and billionaire who made climate change a central plank of his presidential campaign platform, announced he was dropping out of the running for the Democratic nomination on Saturday. The announcement follows a disappointing showing in South Carolina's primary, on which Steyer spent over $22 million trying to win.

Tom Steyer Drops Out of Democratic Primary

From the Left
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Former hedge fund manager Tom Steyer announced Saturday night that he was ending his campaign for the Democratic nomination after a disappointing finish in the South Carolina primary.

“I said if I didn’t see a path to winning that I would suspend my campaign, and honestly, I don’t see a path where I can win the presidency,” Steyer said at an event in Columbia, adding that he would “of course” be supporting the eventual nominee, because they’re all “a million times better than Trump.”...

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From the Right
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Far-left billionaire activist Tom Steyer’s campaign announced on Saturday that the candidate was dropping out of the presidential race after failing again in another Democratic primary.

“The news came after Mr. Steyer, 62, failed to capitalize on his investment of millions of dollars in South Carolina, where he had pinned the hopes of his campaign,” The New York Times reported. “Despite spending more than $175 million on adverting throughout his campaign, Mr. Steyer did not earn any national pledged delegates in Iowa, New Hampshire or Nevada, making South Carolina something...

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From the Center
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Tom Steyer, the billionaire environmental activist and San Francisco hedge-fund founder, said he is ending his Democratic presidential bid after pouring more than $250 million of his personal fortune into it.

“I said if I didn’t see a path to winning that I’d suspend my campaign, and honestly, I can’t see a path where I can win the presidency,” Mr. Steyer said late Saturday, after coming in third in South Carolina’s primary, where he had spent much of his time and resources.

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