Medical Examiner Reports Officer Brian Sicknick Died of Natural Causes

Headline Roundup April 19th, 2021

Washington, D.C.'s chief medical examiner officially ruled that Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick's death was due to natural causes. Sicknick, an officer on duty during the Jan. 6 Capitol breach, had two strokes and died the following day. Two men are accused of assaulting and pepper spraying Sicknick during the Capitol breach, but prosecutors have not connected that assault with Sicknick's death. The medical examiner, Francisco J. Diaz, told the Washington Post the autopsy found no evidence Sicknick suffered an allergic reaction to chemical irritants, and there was no evidence of internal or external injuries. Confusion and speculation spread after Sicknick's death when the New York Times reported that Sicknick had also been beaten with a fire extinguisher on Jan. 6; the Times' article has since been updated.

Some left-rated articles tended to highlight the fact that the two men who allegedly assaulted Sicknick will not likely be charged with murder. Some claim that left-rated media quickly ran with the fire extinguisher story as a cause of Sicknick's death because he was the only one they could claim he was killed by pro-Trump protesters.

Medical Examiner Reports Officer Brian Sicknick Died of Natural Causes

From the Right
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OPINION

Without evidence, America’s corporate media spent weeks hoaxing the American public with the lie Capitol Hill Police Officer Brian Sicknick died after an anti-vote-fraud protester smashed him in the head with a fire extinguisher during the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.

After the fire extinguisher hoax was debunked, the corporate media spread the lie that Sicknick probably died as a result of the riot, maybe from pepper spray or something.

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From the Left
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Capitol Police officer Brian D. Sicknick suffered two strokes and died of natural causes a day after he confronted rioters at the Jan. 6 insurrection, the District’s chief medical examiner has ruled.

The ruling, released Monday, will make it difficult for prosecutors to pursue homicide charges in the officer’s death. Two men are accused of assaulting Sicknick by spraying a powerful chemical irritant at him during the siege, but prosecutors have not tied that exposure to Sicknick’s death.

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From the Center
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A US police officer who died after January's Capitol riot had two strokes and died from natural causes, the chief medical examiner for Washington DC has ruled.

Two men are accused of using a type of pepper spray on Officer Brian Sicknick.

However, the ruling means they are now unlikely to be charged with homicide.

The autopsy found no evidence of an allergic reaction to chemicals, nor of internal or external injuries, Dr Francisco Diaz said.

Officer Sicknick, 42, was defending the Capitol building from supporters of then President Donald...

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