Supreme Court to Hear Landmark Cases on LGBTQ+ Rights

Headline Roundup October 8th, 2019

The Supreme Court of the United States is hearing arguments in a series of landmark cases relating to LGBTQ+ rights and whether Title VII of the Civil Rights Act applies to sexual orientation. Appeals courts have been split, with one case ruled in favor of the petitioner and one against. Both men claimed to be fired for being gay.

The Trump Administration, reversing the policy of the Obama administration, will argue against Title VII being extended, instead making a case that Congress should clarify Title VII's scope.

Supreme Court to Hear Landmark Cases on LGBTQ+ Rights

From the Center
319

At the U.S. Supreme Court, the long-awaited showdown over the rights of LGBTQ employees is center stage. On Tuesday, the justices hear a set of cases testing whether the federal law that bars sex discrimination in employment applies to LGBTQ employees.

Specifically, the question is whether employers are free to fire employees because they are gay or transgender.

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From the Right
319

When the Supreme Court’s nine members take their seats Monday for the start of their next term, the justices will waste little time before confronting a trio of cases that could have major implications for gay and transgender rights.

On Tuesday, the court will hear arguments in legal disputes involving the scope of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which prohibits workplace discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, and religion. The justices will be tasked with deciding whether those protections extend to workers who are...

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From the Left
319

The Supreme Court was hearing arguments Tuesday in two of the term's most closely watched cases over whether federal civil rights law protects LGBTQ people from job discrimination. The cases are the court's first on LGBTQ rights since Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement and replacement by Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

A decision is expected by early summer 2020, amid the presidential election campaign. The issue is whether a key provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that bars discrimination in employment because of sex covers LGBTQ people.

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