DOJ Not Charging NYPD Officer in Eric Garner Case

Headline Roundup July 16th, 2019

The Department of Justice has announced that it will not be charging an NYPD officer in the 2014 death of Eric Garner. Tomorrow marks the fifth anniversary of Garner's death, which occurred after a physical struggle with the officer.

The decision cited the lack of solid evidence against the officer, saying his actions were not the sole cause of Garner's death. Some on the left side of the media paint the decision as being a political statement rather than an objectively legal one; much of the right side of the media is focusing on case and legal facts that favor the officer.

DOJ Not Charging NYPD Officer in Eric Garner Case

From the Center
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WASHINGTON – The Justice Department will not bring federal charges against a New York City police officer over the death of Eric Garner during a chaotic arrest that ignited nationwide protests five years ago.

The decision, announced Tuesday by Brooklyn U.S. Attorney Richard P. Donoghue, marks the end of a civil rights probe into an episode – much of it captured on video – that helped turn a national spotlight on how police officers use force against minorities.

“Like many of you, I have watched that video many times, and...

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From the Right
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The decision to not prosecute NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo in Eric Garner’s death was ultimately made by Attorney General William Barr himself — because of “insufficient evidence” in the case, Brooklyn’s top prosecutor announced Tuesday.

US Attorney Richard Donoghue said that after an extensive five-year investigation, the Department of Justice couldn’t prove that Pantaleo “acted in willful violation of the law” — while noting that Garner was not in a chokehold when he repeatedly gasped, “I can’t breathe.”

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From the Left
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The Justice Department on Monday declined to file federal civil rights charges against the NYPD officer involved in the chokehold death of Eric Garner, whose dying words “I can’t breathe” on July 17, 2014, became a national rallying cry for demonstrations about police treatment of minorities, according to a source familiar with the matter.

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