Should the US Military Send Troops and Weapons to Help in the Russia-Ukraine Conflict?

Headline Roundup March 2nd, 2022

With war raging in Eastern Europe as Russia attacks Ukraine, the issue of potential U.S. military involvement in the conflict looms large.

In his State of the Union speech Tuesday, President Joe Biden said that U.S. forces "are not engaged and will not engage in the conflict with Russian forces in Ukraine." Roughly 14,000 U.S. troops, along with military aircraft and heavy weapons, have been mobilized and sent to Eastern Europe in recent weeks; Biden maintains that they are there to "defend every inch of territory that is NATO territory with the full force of our collective power." President Volodymyr Zelenskyy and other Ukrainian leaders have called for Biden and the U.S. to help establish a "no-fly zone" over Ukraine to deter Russian air attacks.

Most voices across the spectrum oppose the U.S. sending troops or additional weapons to Ukraine, and are also against helping to establish a no-fly zone, which many think would lead to war between the U.S. and Russia. Some on the left highlighted how the U.S. could help by giving priority to Ukrainian refugees and establishing other humanitarian programs. Some on the right suggested Congress funding covert military operations in Ukraine and other alternatives to directly sending U.S. troops. Former U.S. assistant Secretary of Defense Franklin Kramer argued that some U.S. military intervention, such as more weapons, air support and intelligence assistance, is necessary to ensure that Ukraine remains a democratic nation.

From the Right
314
OPINION

The night the Russian attack on Ukraine started, Michael observed, “strikes me that this is the first time we’re really seeing air power live on television that isn’t our own.” Indeed, watching the flying Russian missiles, helicopters, jet fighters, and columns of advancing Russian tanks – and sympathizing with the Ukrainians – generates different feelings than listening to Bernard Shaw and Peter Arnett describe the aerial attack on Baghdad on 1991.

Similarly, this is the first time since the end of the Cold War that the U.S. response is constrained by the...

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From the Center
314
OPINION

The West is facing a profound series of decisions on Ukraine. Despite President Biden’s videoconference with Russian President Putin and agreement to have their teams “follow up” on diplomacy, the threat remains from Russia’s extensive and threatening military buildup on Ukraine’s borders. Maintaining Ukraine’s sovereignty and democracy is a critical challenge demanding an effective response. An appropriate military component needs to be part of that response in the event diplomacy fails.

Russia’s actions and the prospect for conflict have received widespread condemnation from the United States and its allies. Biden has engaged in extensive...

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From the Left
314
ANALYSIS

In 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait in a naked war of territorial aggression. The next year, the US and an allied coalition intervened under the auspices of the United Nations Security Council, repulsing the Iraqi invasion. Today, as Russia is engaged in a similar aggressive war against Ukraine, there is no similar American effort in the offing — even as Ukrainian leaders have pleaded for Western assistance.

There are many dissimilarities between the situations in 1991 and 2022, but the biggest one is this: Saddam Hussein, rather famously, did not have nuclear weapons. Vladimir Putin...

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