Perspectives: Americans Remain Split On Severity Of China-Russia Alliance

Headline Roundup February 20th, 2022

China and Russia affirmed a deep strategic partnership with "no limits" earlier this month, alarming many voices across the political spectrum.

The alliance between the two superpowers, however, is being assessed differently by different sides of the aisle. Left-rated voices often emphasize China and Russia's conflicting interests. Fareed Zakaria, a columnist at The Washington Post (Lean Left bias), argued that the Biden administration "has handled the Ukraine crisis intelligently and effectively," and that China and Russia are "different from one another" and "lumping them together is a sign that ideology has triumphed over strategy in Washington." The New York Times (Lean Left bias) highlighted how China and Russia "compete and disagree on major issues," such as the extent of their respective nation's sphere of influence and trade relations. 

Right-rated voices were more likely to criticize the U.S. for not taking action to weaken the growing relationship between China and Russia. John Bolton, the national security adviser under President Donald Trump, argued that the China-Russia alliance will continue to grow because the two countries’ interests "are mutually complementary for the foreseeable future." He also called America's $700 billion+ defense budget "inadequate" and said Biden needs to take action before the "Russia-China entente grows up to be an axis." One opinion writer for Fox News (Right bias) emphasized the importance of "not sitting on the sidelines," predicting that North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) sanctions on Russia will be "bad for America because it will deepen Russia’s dependence on China."

From the Center
1737
OPINION

As Russia threatens the largest land invasion in Europe since World War II, the most consequential strategic question of the 21st century is becoming clear: How can the United States manage two revisionist, autocratic, nuclear-armed great powers (Russia and China) simultaneously? The answer, according to many politicians and defense experts, is that Washington must moderate its response to Russia in Europe to focus on the greater threat posed by China in the Indo-Pacific.

This would be a mistake.

The United States remains the world’s leading power with global interests, and it cannot afford...

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From the Left
1737
OPINION

The Biden administration has handled the Ukraine crisis intelligently and effectively, formulating a policy that could be described as “deterrence plus diplomacy.” It made credible threats about the costs of a Russian invasion and rallied its European allies in an impressive show of unity. And while (correctly) refusing to promise that Ukraine will be barred from NATO, it has offered to discuss almost everything else, from arms control to missile deployments.

This crisis, however, has highlighted a larger strategic failure, one that extends beyond this administration. One of the central rules of strategy is to divide your adversaries....

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From the Right
1737
OPINION

It’s been more than 75 years since the U.S. last faced an axis of strategic threats. Fortunately, that axis proved dysfunctional. Had it been otherwise, Japan and Germany would have systematically attacked the Soviet Union, not America, first.

Our current strategic adversaries, Russia and China, aren’t an axis. They’ve formed an entente, tighter today than any time since de-Stalinization split the communist world. Involving some mutual interests and objectives, displays of support, and coordination, ententes are closer than mere bilateral friendships but discernibly looser than full alliances. The pre-World War...

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