Uncertainty Surrounds Schools for the Fall; Pediatricians Recommend Reopening

Headline Roundup June 29th, 2020

How to reopen schools this fall remains one of the biggest questions about safely returning to a state of normalcy in the face of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

Many reports on all sides of the media spectrum, particularly on the right, focused on the American Academy of Pediatricians' recommendation that schools prioritize finding a way to hold in-person classes this fall. Some concentrated on feature profiles of students and how they've managed education amid social distancing; others looked closely at the ways in-person classes could be complicated and present purported risk. Some right-rated voices framed a potential lack of in-person schooling as potentially damaging to students' psychological well-being.

Uncertainty Surrounds Schools for the Fall; Pediatricians Recommend Reopening

From the Right
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The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending schools reopen this fall with students "physically present" in their classrooms, as the negative impacts are already being shown in children since schools closed earlier this spring.

"The importance of in-person learning is well-documented," the AAP said in recently released guidance, reports the U.K.'s Daily Mail. "The AAP strongly advocates that all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with the goal of having students physically present in school."

Being away from school for too long can often result in...

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From the Left
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ANALYSIS

School communities desperate for normalcy are hoping that the new school year will be more stable than the last, when the coronavirus forced schools to close and launch remote learning overnight. But that seems like wishful thinking, as 2020-2021 is shaping up to be even more problematic.

School districts are embarking on novel experiments in learning, unveiling plans to reopen with new procedures for just about everything. But none of them are set in stone because the unknowns about how things will work far outweigh the knowns.

That heralds confusion...

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From the Center
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When U.S. schools begin the next academic year with the country still fighting the coronavirus pandemic, students should spend half their time in classrooms and half doing online activities that pinpoint their individual learning style such as videos or reading.

That advice comes from Nimish Mathur, 17, and his team from DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky.

The “I’m So Confused Gang” team submitted its idea for re-opening school in the age of COVID-19 to a competition sponsored by Discover Your Genius (DYG), a nonprofit company that challenges young...

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