Trump Executive Order to Reform Kidney Care

Headline Roundup July 11th, 2019

On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order aimed at transforming kidney care for more than 30 million Americans with kidney disease. The executive order specifically seeks to improve detection and treatment options for kidney disease; the President cited credible data that 96% of people with kidney damage or mildly reduced kidney function are unaware of their condition. The left points out the parallels this executive order seems to draw with Obamacare. The right lauds the President's efforts to reform healthcare. It is unclear as to why a seemingly non partisan issue was resolved through executive order and not by bipartisan congressional measures, such as the First Step Act.

Trump Executive Order to Reform Kidney Care

From the Center
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President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday aimed at helping the more than 30 million Americans who suffer from chronic kidney disease.

The changes outlined in the order are intended to help ease the financial hardships for living donors, make it easier for patients to get in-home dialysis, improve the system for collecting usable kidneys from deceased donors, and to give financial incentives for doctors and clinics to help patients stave off end-stage kidney disease by about six months.

Officials cited a study that suggests long...

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From the Left
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(CNN) On Wednesday, President Donald Trump signed an executive order aimed at transforming kidney care for the more than 37 million Americans with kidney disease. The administration said it is the first kidney-focused executive order since the 1970s.

"Today we are taking groundbreaking action to bring new hope to millions of Americans suffering from kidney disease," Trump said. "So many things don't get done in government, but now we are getting them done."

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From the Right
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President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday paving the way for an overhaul of the way kidney disease, which affects 30 million Americans, is treated in the U.S.

The president's move would lead to sweeping changes in treatment as well as prevention, including improving access to dialysis treatment in the home and enabling people with failing kidneys to have opportunities sooner to get a transplant.

"This is a first, second and third step, it’s more than just a first step,” said Trump just before signing the executive order. “We’re...

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