Supreme Court Says Montana Can't Exclude Religious Schools From Scholarship Program

Headline Roundup June 30th, 2020

In a 5-4 ruling, the Supreme Court has ruled that Montana's exclusion of religious schools from a state scholarship program funded by tax credits violates the U.S. Constitution.

Chief Justice John Roberts, writing for the majority, found that the Constitution's protection of religious freedom "prevails."

Supreme Court Says Montana Can't Exclude Religious Schools From Scholarship Program

From the Left
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Supreme Court, parochial schools, scholarship programs, religious freedom, John Roberts, US Constitution

A divided Supreme Court on Tuesday endorsed a Montana tax incentive program that indirectly helps private religious schools, a major victory for those who want to see more public funding of religious institutions.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., writing for a conservative majority in the 5 to 4 ruling, said the Montana Supreme Court was wrong to strike down the program because of a provision in the state constitution that forbids public funds from going to religious institutions. The U.S. Constitution’s protection of religious freedom prevails, he said.

“A...

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From the Right
319

The Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down a ban on taxpayer funding for religious schools, in a narrow but significant win for the school choice movement.

In the 5-4 ruling, authored by Chief Justice John Roberts, the court essentially backed a Montana tax-credit scholarship program that gave residents up to a $150 credit for donating to private scholarship organizations, helping students pay for their choice of private schools. The state's revenue department made a rule banning those tax-credit scholarships from going to religious schools before the state's supreme court later...

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From the Center
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Supreme Court, parochial schools, scholarship programs, religious freedom, John Roberts, US Constitution

The Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that a Montana policy that excludes religious schools from a general student aid program violates religious freedoms protected under the U.S. Constitution.

The 5-4 majority decision, which fell along ideological lines, said that by making state-backed private school scholarships off-limits to parochial schools, the program ran afoul of First Amendment protections for the free exercise of religion, which prohibits the government from treating religious and secular groups differently.

“A state need not subsidize private education,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the majority. “But...

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