Should We Make Daylight Saving Time Permanent?

Headline Roundup March 15th, 2022

The biannual shift between standard time and Daylight Saving Time in the U.S. is seen as a nuisance by many. Should we make longer days permanent?

The Senate unanimously approved a measure Tuesday to make Daylight Saving Time permanent. If the bill, titled the Sunshine Protection Act, becomes law, Americans would never again be told to set their clocks back an hour in the fall and forward an hour in the spring. The bill has solid bipartisan support, with several Republican and Democratic cosponsors. Currently, 41 of the 48 states that observe daylight saving time (DST) are considering changes that would end the practice of changing between DST and standard time. Supporters often highlight research that suggests positive physical and mental health effects of longer daylight, and negative effects of earlier sunsets. Opponents typically focus on how extended daylight also means the sun rises later.

Many across the political spectrum support ending the back-and-forth and making daylight last longer. Sens. Ed Markey (D-MA) and Marco Rubio (R-FL) wrote an op-ed for CNN (Left bias) this week in support of making DST permanent, calling the switching between DST and standard time "a senseless and outdated government policy." Two writers for National Review argued last year for adopting Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and universal "true time" based around the Sun's position in the sky. Others criticize how making DST permanent would mean the sun would rise later in the winter, thus making mornings darker.

From the Right
13268
OPINION

Article originally published March 12, 2021: It’s that time of year when we “spring ahead” and switch to daylight saving time (DST). There is a good chance that this annual adjustment of the clock will damage not only your wallet but your health, too.

Before the adoption of standard measures of time, churches, city halls, and trains kept solar time. Every city, depending on its location, observed its own solar time, once referred to as “true time” in the United States. In the early 19th century, there were more than 300 “sun zones” in...

Read full story
Some content from this outlet may be limited or behind a paywall.
From the Center
13268
OPINION

This weekend, Americans will change their clocks and lose an hour of sleep, all because of a senseless and outdated government policy. Changing between daylight saving time and standard time isn't just an inconvenience to people everywhere — it has real repercussions for Americans' health, economy and public safety.

We can't always get bipartisan agreement in Congress these days, but here's one thing we can agree on: we could all use a bit more sunshine. That's why we're working together in the US Senate to make sure we end the...

Read full story
From the Left
13268
OPINION

It’s time, as they say on Twitter, to #locktheclock. We need to put an end to the century of back-and-forth. After we spring forward this weekend, we should make daylight saving time permanent.

On Sunday, people in most areas of the country will set their clocks ahead one hour, making it so that darkness falls later in the day. (Clocks will revert, or “fall back,” on Nov. 6 — a federally enforced seasonal shift.) But making daylight saving time permanent would, almost certainly, give the people what they want —...

Read full story
Some content from this outlet may be limited or behind a paywall.