From Schools to Gyms to Family Parties, Public Safety Debates Persist

Headline Roundup July 3rd, 2020

Americans eager to find a safe way to return to normal life are debating which sectors, industries, businesses and public areas should open first, which should maintain heavy restrictions, and which present the highest risk. Debates about public safety aren't just centered on "public" spaces; many Americans are conflicted within their own households about living safely and practicing healthy habits as the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic continues.

Right-rated voices are generally expressing more optimism about the probability of safe and timely re-openings.

From Schools to Gyms to Family Parties, Public Safety Debates Persist

From the Right
13743
OPINION

Children have been out of school long enough. Their return to the classroom is absolutely necessary for their success in learning and moving forward in their educational endeavors come this fall. As a father of two adolescent children, I wholeheartedly applaud and agree with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendation which strongly states "the coming school year should start with the goal of students physically present in school." Remote learning should not be considered unless parents make their own decision to choose to home school their children.

Currently, most...

Read full story
From the Left
13743

The New York Times ran a story this week suggesting that the economic recovery is slowing and, in certain industries in certain parts of the country, even reversing. This makes sense given the resurgence of coronavirus cases in places like Texas and Florida and the more-cautious reopening measures being taken in other, less affected areas worried that a spike might be just around the corner. On Wednesday, New York City announced it would indefinitely postpone the resumption of indoor dining service, as New Jersey did a few days prior. California...

Read full story
From the Center
13743

When shelter-in-place restrictions eased in May in Gurnee, Ill., Laura Davis’s immediate thought was: When are people coming over? The teacher’s mother and two sisters live within driving distance, she said, and her backyard can accommodate social distancing.

It turned out that wasn’t going to be easy.

Ms. Davis, 38, landed in an argument with her older sister over get-together terms. Her sister and mother have health conditions putting them at risk for complications from the new coronavirus and said they would come only if they could sit outside, if...

Read full story