Proposed Education Budget Prompts Support, Questions

Headline Roundup February 12th, 2020

The education section of the Trump administration's budget proposal for fiscal year 2020 has attracted both support and disdain from throughout the political spectrum.

Some coverage focused on potential consequences of funding cuts to charter schools and rollbacks of student loan assistance programs. Other voices, especially on the right, framed the plan as a necessary change to a purportedly ineffective Department of Education.

Proposed Education Budget Prompts Support, Questions

From the Center
171

In Donald Trump's latest budget, aid for lower-income students and programs that offer relief to workers in public service are on the chopping block.

The $4.89 trillion plan, presented to Congress on Monday, would cut the Education Department's budget by $5.6 billion, eking out savings by ending some grants, freezing the maximum amount of others and shifting some payments from the government to borrowers.

A couple of proposals could help those struggling to repay their loans.

The spending plan was criticized by Democrats who control the House and has...

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From the Left
171

THE TRUMP administration would eliminate federal funding for public charter schools under its budget request for 2020, instead allowing states to tap into a $19 billion pool of money to spend on K-12 education as they see fit.

The proposal – from an administration that has made school choice its No. 1 education priority – stands in stark contrast to the last three budget proposals, all of which included major funding increases for the $440 million federal charter school program.

Once a priority, now the federal charter school program is...

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From the Right
171
OPINION

If you love a constitutionally constrained federal government, President Trump’s latest budget request for Betsy DeVos's Department of Education will warm your heart. But there’s more to be done.

Let’s start with the best part: The budget would cut $6.1 billion in education spending overall and consolidate $19.4 billion worth of K-12 programs into simple block grants to states. That cuts federal strings off of a big chunk of education money, and doing so makes sense.

This would be much more in line with the education power the Constitution gives...

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