Federal Reserve To Cut Interest Rates For The First Time In 10 Years

Headline Roundup July 31st, 2019

The Federal Reserve is expected to cut interest rates by a quarter percent today. Some believe this will do little to cut costs that matter to consumers, and some believe that Trump's policies may have set the table for this reduction. However, the market appears to be shrugging it off.

Federal Reserve To Cut Interest Rates For The First Time In 10 Years

From the Right
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Federal Reserve, interest rates

President Donald Trump's repeated calls for easier monetary policy may not be what's driving the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates on Wednesday.

But Trump's policies have set the table for it.

His aggressive tactics on trade, including 25% tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods that prompted retaliatory duties on U.S. exports, have made companies uncertain about the future and more hesitant to invest.

The Fed's beige book, a collection of economic anecdotes from around the country, now regularly features an escalating and eclectic collection of trade-related impacts.

In...

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From the Left
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The Federal Reserve is widely expected to lower interest rates by a quarter-point at its meeting that concludes Wednesday and leave the option open for additional moves despite demands by President Donald Trump for a “large” rate cut.

“We may get a dissent or two, but it seems like a 25-basis-point cut is pretty much locked in,” said Julia Coronado, president and founder of MacroPolicy Perspectives LLC in New York.

The Federal Open Market Committee will issue a policy statement at 2 p.m. after the two-day meeting concludes and Chairman...

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From the Left
835
Federal Reserve, interest rates

The Federal Reserve is expected to cut interest rates for the first in 10 years on Wednesday, and the market appears to be shrugging it off.

The Federal Open Market Committee is expected to announce a rate cut of 0.25% or 25 basis points -- the first such move since the financial crisis in December 2008. Economists and market watchers will be waiting to see if the central bank signals further cuts this year.

But how will the rate cut affect the average American?

The answer, economists say, is not...

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