Americans Are Dying Younger

Headline Roundup November 27th, 2019

People are dying younger in the United States than in other wealthy countries, according to a recently published study on life expectancy and mortality rates. The average American's life expectancy decreased from 78.9 in 2014 to 78.6 in 2017, which is the last year covered in the report. 

Most coverage, regardless of political leaning, concentrated on mortality's apparent across-the-board spike, attributing it to reported increases in suicides, drug overdoses and addiction-related diseases.

Americans Are Dying Younger

From the Left
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In utter defiance of historical trends, people are dying younger and younger in America. But what’s especially troubling is how these people are dying, a new report released this week found.

Life expectancy for Americans overall has dropped the last three years data is available, starting in 2014. Today, an average American can expect to live 78.6 years, down from 78.9 years in 2014.

That reversed a longtime trend of rising life expectancy. Between 1959 and 2016, the average American lifespan shot up from 69.9 years to 78.9 years.

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From the Right
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In 2010, U.S. life expectancy stopped rising. In 2014, it actually began to decline. This reversal can be largely attributed to an increase in the mortality rate of Americans between the ages of 25 and 64, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. U.S. life expectancy rose from 69.9 years in 1959 to 78.9 years in 2014. Average U.S. life expectancy declined in each of the following three years and is now at 78.6 years.

The decline was greater for men (0.4 years) than...

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From the Center
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The engine that powers the world’s most potent economy is dying at a worrisome pace, a “distinctly American phenomenon’’ with no easily discernible cause or simple solution.

Those are some of the conclusions from a comprehensive new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University showing that mortality rates for U.S. adults ages 25-64 continue to increase, driving down the general population’s life expectancy for at least three consecutive years.

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