Your multi-partisan resource for all sides of the issues.
Opinions by the people, for the people.

Should there be campaign contributor disclosure laws?

YES. Knowing the source of campaign funds and ads provides voters key information.

read the argument for this opinion

Expanded Argument:

[improve this argument]

When a candidate’s campaign is largely funded by specific special interests or corporations, it may indicate the candidate will feel beholden to them or that the candidate implied future support of them.

Also, citizens are better able to evaluate claims in campaign ads when they know where the funding organization’s interests lie.

^ Back to the top of this argument

YES. Disclosure laws do not interfere with freedom of speech.

read the argument for this opinion

Expanded Argument:

[improve this argument]

The Supreme Court of the United States has ruled that disclosure requirements about election spending are constitutional (Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission - January 2010, docket 08-205)

^ Back to the top of this argument

YES. Disclosure protects your right not to invest in organizations and corporations funding campaigns you don’t support.

read the argument for this opinion

Expanded Argument:

[improve this argument]

Corporations and unions can be required to disclose what they spend publically (currently some do, but most do not). This informs shareholders, customers, and union members about how their money is being spent so they can decide if they want to continue to invest in or support a particular company or union.

^ Back to the top of this argument

NO. Disclosure helps re-elect incumbents because they can, and some do, threaten retribution to anyone who supports the opposition.

read the argument for this opinion

Expanded Argument:

[improve this argument]

Financial disclosure helps re-elect incumbents and others in power because they can, and some do, threaten retribution to anyone who supports the opposition.

Someone who supports a challenger may be afraid to give a donation because they might lose the government contract, not get that promotion from their boss who supports the other candidate, or other consequence.

^ Back to the top of this argument

NO. Complex laws are a barrier to novices and those with limited funds, giving those with power and money an unfair advantage.

read the argument for this opinion

Expanded Argument:

[improve this argument]

^ Back to the top of this argument